Post-war food and cash crop production in former colonial territories
Read Online
Share

Post-war food and cash crop production in former colonial territories

  • 1 Want to read
  • ·
  • 66 Currently reading

Published by Oxford Development Records Project in Oxford .
Written in English


Book details:

Edition Notes

Statementcompiled by B.J. Silk.
SeriesReport / Oxford Development Records Project -- 8
ContributionsOxford Development Records Project.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL13870543M

Download Post-war food and cash crop production in former colonial territories

PDF EPUB FB2 MOBI RTF

  Cash Crops and Freedom: Export Agriculture and the Decline of Slavery in Colonial West Africa* - Volume 54 Issue 1 - Gareth Austin Please note, due to essential maintenance online purchasing will be unavailable between and (BST) on 24th February Cited by:   Post War Food and Cash Crop Production in Former Colonial Territories. Oxford Development Records Project, Report No. 8. Oxford: Rhodes House Library. (University of Bath, Catalogue Unit for Archives of Contemporary Scientists). Post War Food and Cash Crop Production in Former Colonial Territories. Oxford Development Records Project, Report No. 8. Oxford: Rhodes House Library. (University of Bath, Catalogue Unit for Archives of Contemporary Scientists).   The climate and geography of this region made it perfect for a variety of cash crops, which built the backbone of the southern economy. Among these cash crops .

Evaggelos Vallianatos shows how cash-crop colonialism has undermined African agriculture. Now is the time for a return to indigenous food plants. In , J. H. Bernardin de Saint Pierre, a French. Prior to colonialism, food production in Africa was in the hands of African farmers who grew crops mainly for food production. Many explorers to Africa were more focused on acquiring and shipping raw materials to the western world and considered this the most efficient use of their resources. Over time this way of conducting business became expensive and they sought to diversify ways to.   Before the American Revolution, tobacco was the colonies’ main cash crop, with exports of the aromatic leaf increasing f pounds in to million by By the end of the.   The indigenous smallholder farmers who attempted to make a living selling cash crops could not compete as a result. Eventually, in , the colonial government reinstated cash crop growing in the reserves as a mainstay economic activity. As land became scarce, Kenyans increasingly began favouring cash crops in place of subsistence farming.

  And since they have very little to export save our rare minerals or petroleum, Africans continue the colonial tradition of cash cropping. However, cash crops for export take more and more of the best land from local food production, forcing peasants . After the s, cotton led the bestseller list among cash crops. Invention of the cotton gin, a labor-saving device for removing seeds from the soft fiber, bumped up cotton production. Settlers in the South also cashed in on crops of rice and indigo, both of which they exported to Europe. Lance Cheung/U.S. Department of Agriculture. Christopher Columbus's "discovery" of the Americas in led to the introduction of many novel crops to Europe and subsequently to European colonies in Asia and Africa, forever changing the global food gh it was the European explorers and colonizers who transported foods from the New World to the Old, the native peoples who. There were also small farmers, who had small farms often not even owning the land they worked. Tobacco, rice and indigo were the main crops grown in the southern colonies. All of these were cash crops, sold for money. The crops were usually exported from the colony. The production of these corps required large numbers of workers.